Date: 2018-12-02 04:40 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
This was the Friday night creature feature (despite the lack of creatures) on local TV one night when I was a yoot. By amazing coincidence, it was also on the video track of the con I went to a few weeks ago.

I suspect building the bridge Harry wrecks was one of the biggest lines on the film's budget.

Date: 2018-12-02 04:48 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] ba_munronoe
One could easily get an incorrect impression from the summary that the message was meant to be "don't be a panicky dipshit like this fellow - your government's _got_ this." I wonder what would have ensued if Farnham the Lesser had rented a room in one of those small towns rather than looking for a cave.

And I must give the hoodlums points for emergency preparedness. They must have gotten together, gathered weapons, and set off in search of victims in very short order after the bombs fell. Had they been doing murderous rampage drills?

Date: 2018-12-02 11:40 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
A well-disciplined gang is ready for all eventualities: they drill for atomic war, alien invasion and blimp attack on a weekly basis.

I enjoyed the Tom Lehrer reference, by the way

"Daughter Karen is treated as luggage."

So some aspects of "Lot" are abandoned...

Date: 2018-12-02 06:58 pm (UTC)
glaurung: (Default)
From: [personal profile] glaurung
The daughter and son roles in the original story are reversed in the film. Also, instead of abandoning his worthless family, the paterfamilias in the movie just mansplains to them until they shut up.

Date: 2018-12-02 08:10 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
In the story, isn't it implied that the hero will end up sleeping with the daughter?

Date: 2018-12-02 05:35 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] maruad
I used to work with a guy who would carry a huge roll of cash in his pants pocket at all time. He was 6'3" and said that anyone who could take it from him deserved it. He was a supervisor/negotiator with a small team under him. He later was moved up into middle management, still carrying his wad of cash. Probably over a grand in 1980s Canadian currency. I suspect this sort of thing was more common back in the day.

Date: 2018-12-02 08:40 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] ba_munronoe
Reminds me of a scene from that 1980s comedy, "Night Court":

Dan Fielding (sleazy lawyer): "you carry around that much in _cash_!?"
Bull Shannon (Huge, bald-headed bailiff): "People _rob_ banks, Dan."

Date: 2018-12-03 01:13 am (UTC)
scott_sanford: (Default)
From: [personal profile] scott_sanford
I am surprisingly pleased that I'm not the only one who remembers that exchange.

Date: 2018-12-03 05:02 am (UTC)
From: [personal profile] ba_munronoe
I enjoyed that show, although it did start to age badly in its last couple seasons. Also had a bit of a crush on Markie Post at the time. :)

Date: 2018-12-02 02:18 pm (UTC)
autopope: Me, myself, and I (Default)
From: [personal profile] autopope
I suspect this sort of thing was more common back in the day.

Lest we forget, Diner's Club began operating with other outlets in 1950, and American Express only set up in 1958. Credit and debit cards as we know them were a thing of the future; many people didn't even have bank accounts. (A woman couldn't open a bank account in the United States without her male guardian's permission—father or husband—until the early 1970s, IIRC.)

So folks carried cash around the way that today we'd carry plastic.

(This was still a Thing in Japan circa 2011 — last time I visited — because bank ATMs kept bank opening hours(!) so as not to threaten bank clerks' employment; if you wanted to get cash after 5pm your only option was the Post Office, where the ATMs remained open until 9pm — in central Tokyo.)

Date: 2018-12-02 08:36 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] nojay
Conbinis -- open-all-hours convenience stores -- in Japan have ATMs and will happily dispense money 24 hours a day. Cash is still Emperor there though, it's not uncommon to buy a couple of hundred yens worth of stuff by breaking a 10,000 yen note (worth about 60 quid or a hundred bucks US at today's exchange rate).

Date: 2018-12-03 04:49 pm (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
I tried to make a large purchase at a department store in Okinawa back in, oh, 2005 or so. The clerk had to call their accounting department and read off the card over the phone to get approval for the transaction.

--
Nathan H.

Date: 2018-12-04 10:59 am (UTC)
dormouse1953: (Default)
From: [personal profile] dormouse1953
Reminds me of memories of shopping with my parents around about 1960 in the UK. If you tendered a five pound note, the shop manager would come out of a back room and check that it was genuine. (That would have been been about $12 US at then exchange rates.)

Date: 2018-12-10 03:19 am (UTC)
ethelmay: (Default)
From: [personal profile] ethelmay
The inflation calculator at westegg.com/inflation tells me that $12 in 1960 is almost exactly $100 today, so that makes sense -- people still treat hundred-dollar bills differently. I think I've only ever handled hundreds a few times in my life (admittedly that's partly because cash has become less common in general).

Date: 2018-12-10 10:52 am (UTC)
dormouse1953: (Default)
From: [personal profile] dormouse1953
Indeed, my weekly pocket money from my parents back in 1960 was, I think, 6d a week. That's six old pence. I think it might have gone up around then to a shilling a week, 12 old pennies. I started buying Superman comics about 1962 and they were 9d at my local newsagents (the UK price stamped over the US price).

It used to be easy doing the conversions of currency in those days, as the exchange rate was $2.40 to the pound and there were 240 old pennies to the pound, so one penny was one cent.

The biggest currency note in England today is the £50 (I see there are £100 notes in Scotland) but you rarely see them - the ATMs don't dispense them. There is currently a discussion as to who should be on the new design. Apparently it has to be a dead scientist, and there is strong pressure that it should be a woman. Curiously, this means Margaret Thatcher is eligible.

Date: 2018-12-02 11:04 am (UTC)
londonkds: (Default)
From: [personal profile] londonkds
Supermarkets in the UK still don't refrigerate eggs.

Date: 2018-12-02 01:59 pm (UTC)
tree_and_leaf: Watercolour of barn owl perched on post. (Default)
From: [personal profile] tree_and_leaf
I remember horrifying an American flatmate by the simple means of eating a soft-boiled egg with soldiers. He was genuinely convinced I was going to get salmonella.

Date: 2018-12-02 02:20 pm (UTC)
autopope: Me, myself, and I (Default)
From: [personal profile] autopope
The USA and EU approach to regulating egg hygeine is diametrically different.

USA: "All hens have salmonella!!! You must wash eggs religiously and then chill them and eat promptly!"

EU: "If hens are found to have salmonella, prosecute the farmer. (Oh look, no salmonella.) Washing destroys the natural antibacterial membrane the hen secretes as it lays, so don't wash the eggs: use within six weeks of purchase."

Date: 2018-12-02 05:42 pm (UTC)
bolindbergh: (2)
From: [personal profile] bolindbergh

Informative reading.

There is an apocryphal story from shortly after Sweden joined the EU that goes like this:

Food safety person from $OTHER_EU_COUNTRY after looking at Swedish salmonella statistics: "These numbers are impossibly low! There must be something wrong with your test procedures."

Date: 2018-12-02 06:48 pm (UTC)
magedragonfire: (Default)
From: [personal profile] magedragonfire
The only thing wrong with eggs that are over a month old is that the whites don't whip up as nicely when doing meringues/cakes/souffles/etc.

Date: 2018-12-02 10:46 pm (UTC)
dwight_benjamin_thieme: My daughter Ellen in her debut as Rusty from Footloose (Default)
From: [personal profile] dwight_benjamin_thieme
OTOH, there's nothing like the taste of 'farm fresh' eggs that were laid, literally, in the last 12 hours before they were fried, poached, etc. Mmmmmmm.

Date: 2018-12-03 01:14 am (UTC)
scott_sanford: (Default)
From: [personal profile] scott_sanford
Seen earlier today, "Chickens! The pet that poops breakfast!"

Date: 2018-12-03 12:11 pm (UTC)
tree_and_leaf: Watercolour of barn owl perched on post. (Default)
From: [personal profile] tree_and_leaf
That is true, but all the same, eggs keep for ages (the bowl of water trick is v useful if you are in doubt about whether they're still OK).

Date: 2018-12-05 11:47 am (UTC)
dormouse1953: (Default)
From: [personal profile] dormouse1953
When I started cooking for myself, I asked my mother how I could tell if an egg was bad. She said that once I'd opened it, I'd know it was bad. Well, either she was wrong or I've never seen a bad egg in the nearly forty years since. (Just as well I don't have any curates around for tea.)

Mind you, my mother and eggs is not all plain sailing. She was a local politician on the town council (served as mayor) and was always getting phoned up on some matter, usually whilst eating. One day after she'd finally hung up the phone she found her soft-boiled egg had gone cold. She had just got her first microwave and knew you shouldn't heat eggs in the microwave, but as she'd cut the top off, she thought it would be OK to re-heat it. However, she hadn't punctured the yolk and when she attacked it with her soldiers, a jet of hot yolk shot into the air.

Date: 2018-12-05 06:47 pm (UTC)
tree_and_leaf: Watercolour of barn owl perched on post. (Default)
From: [personal profile] tree_and_leaf
She was right - a bad egg is unforgettable - but a less olfactory risky way is to put it in a bowl of water. If it floats, chuck it (carefully).

Date: 2018-12-06 11:50 am (UTC)
dormouse1953: (Default)
From: [personal profile] dormouse1953
Still, consider that, in round numbers, half a dozen eggs a week for forty years is approximately 12,000 eggs, and none have been noticeably bad to me. So the risk of opening a bad egg seems small enough to forego the floating test.

Date: 2018-12-03 12:13 pm (UTC)
tree_and_leaf: Watercolour of barn owl perched on post. (Default)
From: [personal profile] tree_and_leaf
Oh, I discovered that subsequently (by reading up on it, not by getting salmonella off an American egg). I admit I tend to avoid egg dishes in the US, not so much because I'm worried about the risk of infection given everyone cooks them half to death*, but because the quality is noticeably lower than the eggs I buy at home. Although what will happen to the British egg post-Brexit is a subject that has been occasionally depressing me.

* A rational choice in the circumstances.

Date: 2018-12-02 04:12 pm (UTC)
dormouse1953: (Default)
From: [personal profile] dormouse1953
I have probably done that once a week for the last forty years. (Eaten a soft-boiled egg with soldiers, not horrified an American flatmate. And as I tend not to cut the toast up but tear bits off of it, not so much soldiers as irregulars.)

Date: 2018-12-02 06:11 pm (UTC)
philrm: (Default)
From: [personal profile] philrm
That clears up what was otherwise (to me) a rather inexplicable reference to the military.

Date: 2018-12-02 06:50 pm (UTC)
dormouse1953: (Default)
From: [personal profile] dormouse1953
Not entirely unknown in the US, I think. I remember an episode of the TV series Covert Affairs where there was a married couple and one had prepared breakfast in bed for the other and "boiled egg with buttered soldiers" was mentioned.

Date: 2018-12-03 12:09 pm (UTC)
tree_and_leaf: Watercolour of barn owl perched on post. (Default)
From: [personal profile] tree_and_leaf
Ah, apologies!

I like Dormouse1953's concept of toast irregulars. But either way, a soft boiled egg with buttered toast is one of life's great small pleasures.

Date: 2018-12-02 06:45 pm (UTC)
magedragonfire: (Default)
From: [personal profile] magedragonfire
And yet the Americans will cheerfully eat hamburgers that are 'cooked' to rare.

Date: 2018-12-02 07:54 pm (UTC)
philrm: (Default)
From: [personal profile] philrm
The way God intended.

Date: 2018-12-03 12:10 pm (UTC)
tree_and_leaf: Watercolour of barn owl perched on post. (Default)
From: [personal profile] tree_and_leaf
I agree with the Americans on this, tbf. There's no good reason to cremate your burgers if you haven't let the meat sit around getting dangerously warm before you cook it.

Date: 2018-12-03 04:45 pm (UTC)
elusis: (Default)
From: [personal profile] elusis
Hard pass, unless you're at a place that grinds its own beef from solid cuts. https://www.consumerreports.org/food-safety/why-is-ground-beef-making-people-sick/

Date: 2018-12-03 07:48 pm (UTC)
magedragonfire: (Default)
From: [personal profile] magedragonfire
Yeah, unless the restaurant is the kind of place that is making steak tartare and is meticulous about cleaning its grinder... No, thanks, that's a massive health risk.

Date: 2018-12-03 09:29 pm (UTC)
rwpikul: (Default)
From: [personal profile] rwpikul
Not just solid cuts, solid cuts that haven't been through a mechanical tenderizer. CBC Marketplace found that the needles or blades are very good at pushing any surface contamination right into the middle of the meat.

Date: 2018-12-03 08:04 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] maruad
I seem to remember that US ground beef has been irradiated somewhere in the food chain before it reaches consumers. I could be wrong.

Having said that, "rare" ground beef is not on my list of things I want to eat.

Date: 2018-12-03 08:07 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] maruad
I am fairly certain Canada uses the US model of egg handling. I grew up eating soft boiled eggs with toast but stopped in more recent decades out of laziness. It is easier to toss the eggs in a frying pan and cook them over easy. Also no egg cups to hand wash (I am lazy and use a dishwasher for non-pots and pans). The same goes for poached eggs.

Date: 2018-12-05 12:18 am (UTC)
timgueugen: (Default)
From: [personal profile] timgueugen
Yep, eggs are kept in a cooler in Canadian stores.

Date: 2018-12-06 05:21 pm (UTC)
ethelmay: (Default)
From: [personal profile] ethelmay
In my family we always ate soft-boiled eggs scooped out into a bowl over buttered toast torn into small pieces. For one thing that way one can scoop out the runny bit and toss it. I prefer poached (the white and yolk are more likely to cook evenly) but have never had the patience to get good at them.

Date: 2018-12-06 07:49 pm (UTC)
From: [personal profile] maruad
At one time I owned an egg-poacher that would cook 4 eggs at one time. This was more poached egg than I wanted. Even so, I was sorry when I lost the cups from the cooker.

Date: 2018-12-02 04:08 pm (UTC)
petrea_mitchell: (Default)
From: [personal profile] petrea_mitchell
Wow! A musical reference so obscure, I actually recognize it!

Date: 2018-12-02 07:01 pm (UTC)
glaurung: (Default)
From: [personal profile] glaurung
By coincidence, I watched this film earlier this summer, along with several other nuclear apocalypse movies, and posted a review here: https://glaurung-quena.dreamwidth.org/19341.html

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