galacticjourney: (Default)
[personal profile] galacticjourney

by Gideon Marcus

There's a change a comin'. I'm sure you've seen heralds of its passage. Last summer, hundreds of Whites and Blacks took to the buses and rode into the South, flauting the segregated busing laws. Leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X are rallying their brethren to fight centuries of oppression. For the first time, the Democrats look to be out-Civil Rightsing the Republicans (who would have predicted that in 1948?) Yes, the country is heading toward a long overdue shift, a final resolution of the crisis born in the original Constitution and only half-fought in the bloodiest war of American history.



It's no surprise, then, that we're seeing this war play out in science fiction as well as reality. Speculative literature constitutes our thought experiments, letting us see worlds like ours, but with allegorical players or, perhaps, a great time shift. Some authors approach the topic tangentially, for instance depicting Blacks as fully integrated in a future setting. Others, approach the subject head-on.

SF author J.F. Bone is a bit of a cipher. I have no biographical information about him at all. I only know that he started writing a few years ago, and his works have a certain thoughtfulness that elevates it above the run of the mill. His recent Founding Father was a fascinating look into the mindset of a slavemaster, made particularly chilling by its light tone.



Bone's latest work is a novel called The Lani People. It is a more straightforward investigation of prejudice and discrimination, set 5000 years in the future.



(see the rest at Galactic Journey!)
thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
CUT WARNING FOR THOSE WHO HAVE TROUBLE WITH OR READING ABOUT DENTAL PROCEDURES
Read more... )

Birthday greetings and felicitations

Apr. 25th, 2017 05:48 pm
onyxlynx: Festive pennants in blue & purple with word "Birthday" centered. (Birthday)
[personal profile] onyxlynx
Happy 100th to Ella Fitzgerald, singer extraordinaire.

(Selected samples.)

Crown of Binding Thorns

Apr. 25th, 2017 08:54 pm
flemmings: (Default)
[personal profile] flemmings
Crown of Binding Thorns is pure Tanith Lee territory but it doesn't treat it in a Tanith Lee way at all: could not be more different, in fact. This is probably a good thing, because Lee is hot fudge sauce: a little goes a very long sweet cloying sticky way. But de Bodard is somehow too dry for my tastes as well. I'm not sure what the problem is but I noticed it in the Acatl books as well. As if I'm being kept at arm's distance somehow from the events. Or maybe that the events are all tied up in plots and politics, which I find dull by nature: so that even with fallen angels and Vietnamese dragons and alchemical magicians and Paris in tatters, the atmosphere of the Pentagon Papers spreads its grey dust throughout.

also

Apr. 25th, 2017 05:09 pm
solarbird: (Default)
[personal profile] solarbird
You know you played a good game when your team loses but despite that you get eight votes on your card.

and desktop

Apr. 25th, 2017 05:07 pm
solarbird: (vision)
[personal profile] solarbird
Navbar 3.1 for Desktop.

Both of these include first drafts of design/guideline docs.

Relevant medical advice

Apr. 25th, 2017 05:05 pm
annathepiper: (Wee Little Puppet Man)
[personal profile] annathepiper

Addendum to my nose report! If you remember the cartoon Home Movies, you may recall that some of the characters in its cast had a band. And that one of their songs was rather pertinent to my medical experiences this week. I give you:

Also, if you’re a fan of Heather Dale (and if you’re not, I recommend it, as her voice is amazing and I love her fondness for Arthurian mythos but also her song about Sedna), she has a song that’s medically pertinent this week as well:

Sadly, the Internet has failed me in providing a proper gif of Angel from the episode “Smile Time”, when he gets turned into a Muppet version of himself and demonstrates that his nose comes off.

I have also likewise been unable to find a gif of Rimmer from the “Parallel Universe” episode of Red Dwarf, where he’s telling Lister about his date with Lorraine. “Of course, she had an artificial nose. Tastefully done! Quality metal. No rivets.” ;D

(Both of these are of course referenced in Dara’s song “Sad Muppet”! Which I would point you at except Dara doesn’t have a public recording of “Sad Muppet” available yet. But with the chorus SAD MUPPET HAS NO NOSE, it’s arguably the theme song of this week too.)

Mirrored from angelahighland.com.

And now, the nose report

Apr. 25th, 2017 04:48 pm
annathepiper: (Katara Healing)
[personal profile] annathepiper

So yeah! Yesterday morning I went in for that septorhinoplasty I posted about. I’m now on Day 2 of Recovery Week, and so far, everything is going all right.

Read the rest of this entry » )

Mirrored from angelahighland.com.

FMK #9: Second Books

Apr. 25th, 2017 07:07 pm
melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
[personal profile] melannen
Note to self, things your circle is v. interested in: Library classification. Canadian art.

So, back on the wagon with FMK! I posted about Growing Up Weightless yesterday and I am very nearly done with Snow Queen. After that Electric Forest should be quick and then I will be caught up! Except the six library books! But we aren't talking about those!

Fewer of you than I thought voted that you change your poll answers after reading the comments! I am apparently in the more easily swayed group. :P


This week's theme is I Read the First One And It Was Good But For Years I Could Never Find The Next One But Then I Did So Here It Is Yay

(In a it's the first one I couldn't find instead of the next one, but close enough.)


How FMK works, short version: I am trying to clear out my unreads. So there is a poll, in which you get to pick F, M, or K. F means I should spend a night of wild passion with the book ASAP, and then decide whether to keep it or not. M means I should continue to commit to a long-term relationship of sharing my bedroom with it. K means it should go away immediately. Anyone can vote, you don't have to actually know anything about the books.

I pick a winner on Friday night (although won't actually close the poll, people can still vote,) and report results/ post the new poll on the following Tuesday, and write a response to the F winner sometime in the next week.

If you want to be extra-helpful, bear in mind that it may have been two decades since I read the first on, and note whether I need to re-read that one first.

Link to long version of explanation (on first poll)

Poll: Adams, Cherryh, Ellis, Gibson, Handeland, ab Hugh, Jones, Kotzwinkle, Lackey, Monette, Snyder, Watt-Evans, White  )

hullo

Apr. 26th, 2017 12:48 am
marsleuthial: (stock // rainbow heart)
[personal profile] marsleuthial posting in [community profile] 2017revival
Name: Maria
Age: 28
Location: Norway
Tumblr/Goodreads/IG/etc: screamtrain @ Goodreads

Describe yourself in five sentences or less: Queer lady person with too many records and not enough shelves for my books. I live in a small costal village, where I work in a museum. I enjoy traveling, cartoons, comedy and petting animals. She/her.

Top 5 fandoms: I used to be all about the fandoms, but lately... not so much! I read fanfic for a handful of fandoms, but it's p chill on that front at the moment. Actually, can podcasts be a fandom? I'm super into podcasts right now!
  1.  all the podcasts
  2.  Harry Potter
  3.  The Thick of It
  4.  Buffy (I'm re-watching the series along with Buffering the Vampire Slayer!)
  5.  Brooklyn 99

I mostly post about: Day to day life, music, comics, books, struggles with anxiety and depression etc.

My last three LJ posts were about: Life update, work goings-on, meeting a cat

How often do you post? It varies a lot! My journal was all but abandoned and updated about 1-2 times a year while on LJ, but putting in an effort to be more active after the move. Going try try to have at least two a week from now on.

How about commenting? Normally fairly regularly, but will vary in accordance to how busy I am irl.

A GIF to describe how your day has been today so far:


(no subject)

Apr. 25th, 2017 05:10 pm
yhlee: Korean tomb art from Silla Dynasty: the Heavenly Horse (Cheonmachong). (Korea cheonmachong)
[personal profile] yhlee
Rick Riordan Imprint Acquires First Three Titles:
Lee’s book, Dragon Pearl, a standalone middle grade novel, stars Min, a teenage fox spirit whose brother is missing and thought to have deserted the Thousand Worlds Space Forces in order to find the pearl of the title, an artifact that may have the power to save their struggling space colony. Lee says the toughest part of writing for a new audience was working with shorter chapters and a different vocabulary; the idea for the story itself came to him quickly. “I was pretty sure nobody else would come up with a space opera based on Korean mythology,” he said.


(IF THERE ARE OTHER KOREAN MYTHOLOGY SPACE OPERAS PLZ TELL ME I WANT TO READ THEM THE MORE THE MERRIER!!!)

The other two, which I am super looking forward to reading, are Roshani Chokshi's Aru Shah and the End of Time, first of a projected quartet about "a 12-year-old Indian-American girl who unwittingly frees a demon intent on awakening the God of Destruction," and Jennifer Cervantes's Storm Runner, "about a 13-year-old boy who must save the world by unraveling an ancient Mayan prophecy." I may have to fight my daughter over who gets to read them first. =D =D =D

Anyway, that's what I'm working on right now!

Vaguely sinister garbage bins...

Apr. 25th, 2017 05:48 pm
batwrangler: Just for me. (Default)
[personal profile] batwrangler
.... are proliferating on my back deck like some kind of improbable alien menace from a Dr. Who Christmas special.

navbar 3.1 for mobile

Apr. 25th, 2017 02:08 pm
solarbird: (ART-gonzo)
[personal profile] solarbird
I've given mobile navbar some more thought. Welcome to Navbar 3.1 for mobile: now with swipe chevrons and better previous/next spacing, but without up arrows anymore because they couldn't be made to fit. Also a completely different login bar which will pop up dialogues because the more desktop-like one simply did. not. work. and never would. BUT: it's zero additional clicks as specced.

Brain, come back.

Apr. 25th, 2017 03:44 pm
dorothy1901: Gilda: Put the blame on Mame (Default)
[personal profile] dorothy1901
I've been poking into Microsoft Certification, Microsoft Learning, and Microsoft Virtual Academy. Today I was watching a video on how to build a Hyper-V test lab on my home PC. I followed along as the two instructors (Not!Siskel and Not!Ebert) explained how to enable the Hyper-V client on a Windows 10 platform, when all of a sudden they stopped making sense.

Not!Ebert: "Once you have Hyper-V up and running, it's a question of attaching your evaluation software using a downloaded ISO disk image file as a virtual DVD drive on your virtual machine. And then you just install the software on the VMs as you would a hardware host. Anything I'm missing, Christopher?"

Me: Evaluation software? ISO disk image file? Virtual DVD drive?

Not!Siskel: "Nope, nothing, the short answer, no, seems pretty straightforward."

Me: STRAIGHTFORWARD???

In other eye-rolling moments today, I followed a link to an article on the eleven nations of the United States. Here's part of the description of Deep South: The Deep South was established by English slave lords from Barbados and was styled as a West Indies-style slave society, Woodard notes. It has a very rigid social structure and fights against government regulation that threatens individual liberty. The article does not acknowledge the gargantuan disconnect between "individual liberty" and "slave society."

Why Journalism & Media Are Bubbles

Apr. 25th, 2017 04:01 pm
al_zorra: (Default)
[personal profile] al_zorra
      . . . . Politico is running a fascinating, illuminating report about journalism and why it is the way it is.  Or another way to put it, this report informs us to why the journalists and talking heads called the latest US presidential so wrong. This applies at least as much in every other country that still has has any vestige of a history of free expression, free press and investigative journalism -- whether Britain, Japan, etc.  Read the Politico piece here.



The Media Bubble Is Worse Than You Think
We crunched the data on where journalists work and how fast it’s changing. The results should worry you.
By JACK SHAFER and TUCKER DOHERTY May/June 2017
 
 
 
I've pulled a pertinent sequence, which follows below.  However the report is much more detailed and long than that.  It has graphs and stats like crazy.

.... The newspaper industry has jettisoned hundreds of thousands of jobs, due to falling advertising revenues. Dailies have shrunk sections, pages and features; some have retreated from daily publication; hundreds have closed. Daily and weekly newspaper publishers employed about 455,000 reporters, clerks, salespeople, designers and the like in 1990, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. By January 2017, that workforce had more than halved to 173,900. Those losses were felt in almost every region of the country.

 
As newspapers have dwindled, internet publishers have added employees at a bracing clip. According to BLS data, a startling boom in “internet publishing and broadcasting” jobs has taken place. Since January 2008, internet publishing has grown from 77,900 jobs to 206,700 in January 2017. In late 2015, during Barack Obama’s second term, these two trend lines—jobs in newspapers, and jobs in internet publishing—finally crossed. For the first time, the number of workers in internet publishing exceeded the number of their newspaper brethren. Internet publishers are now adding workers at nearly twice the rate newspaper publishers are losing them.

This isn’t just a shift in medium. It’s also a shift in sociopolitics, and a radical one. Where newspaper jobs are spread nationwide, internet jobs are not: Today, 73 percent of all internet publishing jobs are concentrated in either the Boston-New York-Washington-Richmond corridor or the West Coast crescent that runs from Seattle to San Diego and on to Phoenix. The Chicagoland area, a traditional media center, captures 5 percent of the jobs, with a paltry 22 percent going to the rest of the country. And almost all the real growth of internet publishing is happening outside the heartland, in just a few urban counties, all places that voted for Clinton. So when your conservative friends use “media” as a synonym for “coastal” and “liberal,” they’re not far off the mark.

What caused the majority of national media jobs to concentrate on the coasts? An alignment of the stars? A flocking of like-minded humans? The answer is far more structural, and far more difficult to alter: It was economics that done the deed.

The magic of the internet was going to shake up the old certainties of the job market, prevent the coagulation of jobs in the big metro areas, or so the Web utopians promised us in the mid-1990s. The technology would free internet employees to work from wherever they could find a broadband connection. That remains true in theory, with thousands of Web developers, writers and producers working remotely from lesser metropolises.

But economists know something the internet evangelists have ignored: All else being equal, specialized industries like to cluster. Car companies didn’t arise in remote regions that needed cars—they arose in Detroit, which already had heavy industry, was near natural resources, boasted a skilled workforce and was home to a network of suppliers that could help car companies thrive. As industries grow, they bud and create spinoffs, the best example being the way Silicon Valley blossomed from just a handful of pioneering electronics firms in the 1960s. Seattle’s rise as a tech powerhouse was seeded by Microsoft, which moved to the area in 1979 and helped create the ecosystem that gave rise to companies like Amazon.



 
 

The Pilot

Apr. 25th, 2017 09:08 pm
purplecat: Texture by simpleandclean (LiveJournal) (Doctor Who)
[personal profile] purplecat
Season openers and companion introductions are always a little insubstantial. They generally have a lot of ground to cover, in introducing (or re-introducing) characters while at the same time wanting to keep things fairly fast-paced and not too serious. In general I would say that Doctor Who has erred on the side of "light and fast-paced" with a focus on the companion's reaction to adventure. The Pilot clearly chose to go a little slower than usual in its introduction of Bill. It spends a lot of time establishing her relationship to the Doctor in the absence of any peril or adventure and only then brings the sci-fi plot of the episode forward.

On the whole I thought it did a good job of introducing Bill. I'm not as super-excited about her as a lot of people are, I got a sense of the script trying a little too hard to be funny in places. An "Educating Rita" relationship between Doctor and companion is an excellent idea but there is a fine line between portraying someone as bright, but uneducated, and being a little condescending towards your character and I'm not sure the script always got this right. That said I thought it was interesting that, while the show made much of how like the Doctor Clara was, in manner Bill is much more like the Doctor - in particular her tendency to gabble when either she is trying to deflect a line of questioning or she is simply nervous. She also has some of Capaldi's awkwardness of manner. I thought the monologue about serving her crush chips was great and very Doctorish in a lot of ways*.

A big deal was made in the pre-publicity for The Pilot that Bill would be a lesbian and, paradoxically, that big deal would not be made of this in the show. I was a little bemused in advance about how this could be achieved. Let's face it, Doctor Who is not the kind of show in which people discuss their sexuality a great deal (albeit this has been more common in NuWho than in Classic Who). How, I wondered, does one casually throw a mention of sexuality into a Doctor Who story? The answer, in retrospect, was obvious. I liked that the plot was driven by Bill's romantic interest.

That said the plot itself felt like it had some glaring holes in it. It is always difficult with a science fantastical show like Doctor Who to discuss what is, and isn't, realistic within the world of the show. However Heather, as the Pilot's, ability to cross time and space in sequence with the order of events as experienced by Bill and not in strict temporal order seemed... unlikely. The plot was also, as "Deb from Philadelphia" in the Verity podcast pointed out, something of a "greatest hits" of a number of things we have seen several times before in NuWho - all the more so when you throw "Educating Rita" into the mix. There were some lovely moments but on a story level, I wasn't particularly excited by this.

The set up shown, of the Doctor semi-fixed in a contemporary university is, hopefully, a chance for the show to be a little different this season. This is certainly a very different Doctor in lots of ways from the one we saw in seasons 8 and 9. One of my favourite moments in the story was the realisation that he had gone back in time to provide Bill with missing photos of her mother. This is a very different person from the one who had to read out cue cards, supplied by Clara, in order to interact appropriately with distressed humans. Nardole may have commented on his obliviousness to Bill's distress at the end, but this still seemed like a Doctor who had come a long way in his understanding of, or at least his willingness to deal with (I was never entirely convinced that the Doctor was oblivious to the feelings of those around him) the emotions of everyone else.

I've no strong feelings about Nardole. I like his dynamic with the Doctor which is so different to the typical Doctor Companion dynamic, but he was very much in the background here.

Overall I liked this. I thought it was a little slow at the start, but the new Tardis team and the university setting (albeit, as Tame Layman pointed out, university's don't work like that - though universities remain quixotic enough that it's not beyond the realms of possibility) have promise. As a long time fan, I'm rarely particularly excited by season openers, especially when they are designed (as this one clearly was) as a jumping on point, I'm too keen to get on with the story, but this one did its job.

*and yes there was a fat joke, but surely Bill as a character is allowed to be awkward about her attitude to weight - it's not like most people don't have an awkward relationship to weight.

(no subject)

Apr. 25th, 2017 03:42 pm

(no subject)

Apr. 25th, 2017 12:00 pm
[personal profile] martianmooncrab
It just keeps on raining here.. sigh, I love the rain, but I would like a few more sunny days so I can finish planting things first. And mow the lawn.

The tulips are blooming, all the different colors and kinds. With plunking a few flowers here and there its starting to fill in. I look at the hollyhock starts, they are so short and small, but I know that they will grow and reach up.

the lecture last night was interesting to me, the chronology of the Kings Tombs (if he had done every dynasty it would have been a very long lecture) and how the tomb and the mortuary temples expanded and contracted, design and function. It piqued my interest in Hatshepsut's mortuary temple complex and area, I hadnt realized that there was another Kings temple there. I had been aware that there were other structures in that area, and some courtiers tombs. My sister went with me to the lecture, she had a good time, she isnt as mad about Egypt as I am, so I like it when she doesnt hate it.

I finally got to try the Starbucks Unicorn Frap, its more like liquid tart Jolly Rancher candy, one friend had described it more Sweet Tart like.

Today, New Book Tuesday.

I got woke up early, they are weed whacking the greenspace behind my house, and they of course started at the end by my place... so not quiet. It lead to odd dreams about my back fence collapsing.

TV Post: Legion

Apr. 25th, 2017 11:27 am
radiantfracture: (two)
[personal profile] radiantfracture
Recently LB & S & I finished the first season of Legion.

The visual and sound design are amazing – particularly the sound, actually, which was reminiscent in parts of (what little I know about) Gaspar Noé’s soundscapes – for example, the use of low-frequency tones that make you tense and/or vaguely nauseous.

Legion is giddy and intoxicating, and each night when we were finished I walked home in a genuinely altered state.

Several Spoilers for Legion Season 1, and Some Points of Critique )

To sum up: brilliant sensory experience, clever structure, rollercoaster-of-the-mind plot, and slightly disappointing lack of risk-taking with the characters/focus, given the other accomplishments of the show.

{rf}


Notes

1. Though certainly the Kerry/Cary dyad doesn't split along traditional gender lines.

2. To be fair, that might actually be true, but it's not necessarily something to revel in, narratively.

"Emotional problems" might not be the right term here, since the story is at least ostensibly about mental illness, but Legion felt preoccupied with David's negotiation of his powers, rather than with the lived experience of mental illness itself. Then, I don't know where they're going with David's identity, or how close it will be to the comic character.

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